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Fiorldland back to Shearwater

5 July 2018 | MB
Last night we had a rude awakening. At 2am a squall moved through with strong wind gusts, thunder and lightening. A fitting end to an excessively hot day. Today was Kynoch Inlet, another inlet with wild and magnificent scenery and part of the Fiordland Recreation Area. More snow-covered peaks and granite walls rising straight out of the water. Kynoch has a wonderful waterfall as you enter, similar in size to Chatterbox Falls in Princess Louisa Inlet. But it falls directly into the inlet so you can drive your boat right up to it if you dare (I didn’t dare). At the bottom of one of the long, steep gullies there was a snow patch, only feet above the salt water level. Tonight we’re in Windy Bay, which is not well named. It is almost calm and, while deep, the bay is most comfortable. It has cooled down to 70 so we expect to sleep well tonight.

6 July 2018 | MB
Today marked the high point of our trip, literally. We rounded Fawn Point at the north end of Roderick Island and started our journey south. We left a tremendous amount unexplored — fodder for future trips. We passed a pod of six orcas and then by the native village of Klemtu and picked up a cellular connection for a while so we downloaded email and checked the weather forecast — it said “getting better” — without all the jargon. We’re back where we spent the hot day but now it is 64 degrees and raining. On the trip north we explored the inlets on the mainland side. Now we are going to head south among the islands on the edge of the ocean. Something completely different.

The Big House at the native village of Klemtu

The Big House at the native village of Klemtu

7 July 2018 | MB
It rained hard all night so we slept late in retaliation and had a leisurely breakfast. But we had to leave sometime so amongst the showers, mist and fog we started out. The more the day went on the better the weather became so that now there is some sun and patches of blue. This qualifies as a good day for around these parts. We went through Rait Narrows, the narrowest passage yet, and headed for an out of the way anchorage that we expected to have to ourselves but there was already another boat there when we arrived. At the far end of our anchorage there is a lagoon with a rock-filled entrance (with five kinds of starfish!), but as the tide rose we were able to explore it. It isn’t very big but there were six streams emptying into it, no doubt swollen by recent rains. The surrounding hillsides are old growth direct giving a very wild feeling. Lovely.

8 July 2018 | MB
We anchored for the night in Strom Cove. It’s only somewhat protected from northwest winds, which is exactly what we have today. But we can see over a low point into Seaforth Channel. What makes that interesting is that all inside passage traffic heading north or south must pass by here. We’ve already seen one BC Ferry, and hope to see some cruise ships before the evening is out. There is good exploring here too. We found evidence of past commercial activity on both sides of the cove, probably logging. But it must have been some time ago as all the trees you can see are quite large. We found lots of beach glass from old bottles. There is a rough trail over a low peninsula leading to a big bay to the south. So it’s not a perfect anchorage — did I mention it’s deep? 65 feet where we dropped the anchor, but it has its charms. The pesky deer flies are not among them though — the natural result of warmer, sunnier weather.

9 July 2018 | MB
It’s a warm sunny day and we are back in Shearwater to fuel up for our trip back and reprovision with fresh fruit and veggies. The boat continues to perform well with mostly routine maintenance. There are a number of boats here in Shearwater that haven’t been as fortunate and are either stuck at the dock waiting for repairs or are hauled out in the small boatyard. We like having a break on land but are anxious to be on our way. More to come.

A humpback whale surprisingly close to the dock

A humpback whale surprisingly close to the dock

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