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Fish Egg Inlet to Shearwater

21 June 2018 | MB
Our first problem today was a reoccurrence of Karen’s vertigo affliction. The antihistamines seem to help. We are keeping a close watch on it. The rest of the day was spent winding our way between many rocks and islands, first in an area near Pruth Bay called Choked Passage on the edge of the Pacific, then in a complicated Inlet called Fish Egg Inlet. It’s complex navigation with narrow passages and many hazards to avoid, but we ended up safely in a lovely bay with nothing around except eagles and ospreys. We enjoy the sound of the waterfall at the head of the bay. Nice, though cloudy and cool. Now we need to make our way to the big city, Shearwater, for provisioning. We understand the local grocery store gets fresh food weekly on Sunday night so we want to time our visit for Monday. Boy we hate a deadline.

22 June 2018 | MB
Had a short day today — 2 hours. But we ended up at another lovely lagoon, this one with a very tricky entrance that has to be negotiated at a higher tide as it is only four feet deep at low tide. We took a dinghy ride around before the afternoon wind came up and set a crab trap. Hope does spring eternal. Our greatest excitement was the hot showers. We love our water maker since we have, in essence, an unlimited supply of fresh water, and hence hot showers whenever we feel the need. It hardly feels we are on a boat in a vast wilderness.

23 June 2018 | MB
At one time this area of the BC Coast witnessed tremendous salmon runs. In those days before refrigeration a cannery was needed near the runs to commercialize the salmon harvest. Today we visited Namu, a long abandoned cannery slowly falling down and going back to nature. We could have anchored and rowed ashore but we thought the ruins would be too dangerous to explore so we passed by slowly. It stands as a testament to the fleeting nature of economic fortune. Today, most of the salmon are gone and now the salmon-fed jobs in the area are related to the many fly-in fishing resorts that dot the coast rather than the cannery. Namu is an interesting part of the scenery on this coast. We ended the day in Codville Lagoon Marine Park. Actually, it looks just as wild as every other part of the coast, so I don’t know what makes it a Marine park. At the head there is a 1.2 mile trail to a lovely fresh water lake with a Long Beach of fine pink granite. A nice treat for the end of the day.

Nice hike to a lake at Codville Lagoon

Nice hike to a lake at Codville Lagoon

24 June 2018 | MB
Cool, foggy, rainy. Still, the day started out well when we retrieved our crab trap and found three keepers, one of which was quite large. A nice reward for a row in the rain. We cooked up two and froze them for later and saved one for dinner. We decided to continue on towards our planned stop in Shearwater, a major resort community. It’s a stop on the BC ferry, between Port Hardy, on Vancouver Island, and Prince Rupert. We expect to stock up on fuel, groceries and perhaps even an espresso, though for the groceries we will probably need to take a water taxi to nearby Bella Bella. We are looking forward to it. So we are parked in a tranquil, calm one-boat cove about five miles away off Gunboat Passage, which is a narrow winding “back route” into Shearwater. Nice.

Caught three nice crab in Codville Lagoon

Caught three nice crab in Codville Lagoon

As we left Codville Lagoon, we were passed by the Disney Wonder, 988-foot long cruise ship bound for Vancouver. Very pretty, from a respectable distance of course.

The Disney Wonder passed nearby.

The Disney Wonder passed nearby.

25 June 2018 | MB
We’re in the “big city” of Shearwater. Not much here except a large resort with marina, store, restaurant, coffee shop and boatyard. It must be really popular though since there is lots of housing nearby for resort employees. There’s even a school. We picked up some fuel and a spot on the dock and headed up to the store. They had some good things so we were able to check off most of the items on our list. After laundry we went for a couple of short but nice hikes. One was on a trail through a peat bog. Very interesting, like a bonsai garden. The other was along a nearby ridge that was mostly treeless with wonderful views of the islands and channels around here. We have been joined here by a number of boats we’ve seen in other places up here. It’s a pretty small group of cruisers all going to the same places at different times intersecting once in a while. Fun.

26 June 2018 | MB
Our second day in Shearwater and it was interesting as well. We took the water taxi to Bella Bella, which is a First Nations community that truly is the big city. It has a hospital, the only medical facility between Port Hardy and Prince Rupert. It also has a large, well-stocked grocery store with fresh made bread. We visited the local cultural center, which happens to be in the school, and just happened to be on hand for a major event, the raising of the first corner pole of their new big house. The pole is a 20-foot long by 2-foot diameter red cedar tree. Impressive. They had to use a crane to lift it. Back in Shearwater, we went for a 6-mile hike to a lake, following the bear tracks, and later treated ourselves to dinner out to celebrate our anniversary — 39 years so far. Two days in port is long enough, though. We look forward to being on the move again.

At Shearwater, the regional hub of services.

At Shearwater, the regional hub of services.

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