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Rivers Inlet to Hakai

16 June 2018 | MB
Today was a perfect summer day — blue sky, sun, high about 72. We went all of 8 miles to Dawsons Landing for an overnight stop at a marina. Now, Dawsons doesn’t really resemble anything known as a marina further south. It’s a collection of float houses in various states of disrepair lined up along a long dock. But it has everything a marina is supposed to have. So we picked up some groceries at the small store, did our laundry and waited for the grizzly bears to come out exploring the log boom tied just off our dock. We’re told they don’t often come onto the boat dock — comforting thought. They had an excellent WiFi connection so I managed to reset my iPod, which I had somehow erased, and restore all the music and podcasts. Those podcasts of 1940s radio shows are part of our nightly entertainment. Karen finds a radio broadcast of Nero Wolf or The Thin Man is very nap inducing. For dinner we had the lone success of our crabbing endeavors to date — a single Dungeness crab. Boy was it good.

17 June 2018 | MB
We saw our first grizzly today, swimming between two islands just as we left Dawson’s Landing. Now that’s a safe encounter. We timed our passage through the Draney Narrows entrance for slack water so we could visit Draney Inlet. It is a lovely narrow Inlet with deep water and high hills which unfortunately shows many scars of previous logging activity, including some recent clear cuts. We anchored in Allard Bay which is almost free of visible clearcuts. It looked small on the chart but turned out to be very spacious when we got here. We appear to be the only cruising boat around. An easy, quiet day.

18 June 2018 | MB
We awoke in Allard Bay to a lovely sight. Sun was on the higher peaks though we were in shadow and a thin veil of wispy fog covered parts of the hillsides. But it was thin enough so blue showed through with sunlight in places. Sunrise for us was 9am. Allard Bay runs north-south, is narrow and has high hills on both sides. The result was sunrise for us was more than three and a half hours after official sunrise. We did some more exploring and went out through Draney Narrows at slack with no issues. Tonight we are in another one-boat cove — at least I’m hoping another boat doesn’t try and squeeze in. Another wilderness experience. We don’t tire of them.

Allard Bay as the sun rose

Allard Bay as the sun rose

19 June 2018 | MB
Today was whale day! As soon as we hit deep water we saw a solitary humpback feeding in the distance. He moved closer as we went on so we had a couple of good views. Heading north in the waves of Fitz Hugh Sound we saw a small pod of Orcas in the distance. Later, when we were anchored in Keith Bay near Hakai, we saw a long, light green shape underwater glide by about 30 feet away and cross just in front of our bow. At first we thought it was a school of jellyfish but it was moving too quickly for that. A minute later he rose to the surface about 100 feet away and we could see it was a small grey whale. He continued his tour of our bay before quietly gliding out. He came close to both our boat and our anchor chain but didn’t disturb either. Quite the experience. After the wind dropped a bit we rowed to shore and hiked to the top of a local hill with a microwave relay tower on top. It was above tree line and had a cold, foggy wind blowing. Reminded me of my mountaineering days but this was only 600 feet above sea level. It wasn’t a perfect day, too much wind and not enough sun, but it was magical for all that.

20 June 2018 | MB
We picked up our anchor and drove the 2 miles to Pruth Bay. The bay is home to the Hakai Beach Institute, an ecological research institution with a large variety of programs. They have more than a dozen small boats to ferry researchers around — a real hub-bub of activity. But for us the attraction is a trail from the bay to a large beach on the Pacific Ocean. That large beach is connected to others via a network of trails over headlands to get from beach to beach. We went to eight. They are all pristine white sand sloping gently into the sea so there is lots of beach at low tide. Karen was In her element, finding abalone shells and feathers to add to her collection and generally exploring the nooks and crannies between waves. We had a wonderful time even though it was foggy and cool all day. Our phones say we walked 8.5 miles and climbed 40 flights over 20,000 steps. We definitely should have spent more tome getting into shape before we left.

One of the eight beaches at Hakai

One of the eight beaches at Hakai

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